Object

Spatial distribution of nesting and foraging sites of two Acrocephalus warblers in a Mediterranean reedbed
This publication is protected and can be accessed only from certain IPs.
This publication is protected and can be accessed only from certain IPs.

Title: Spatial distribution of nesting and foraging sites of two Acrocephalus warblers in a Mediterranean reedbed

Subtitle:

Acta Ornithologica, vol. 35, no. 1 ; Rozmieszczenie przestrzenne miejsc gniazdowych i żerowisk dwóch gatunków z rodzaju Acrocephalus w trzcinowiskach śródziemnomorskich ; Nesting and foraging sites of two Acrocephalus species

Contributor:

Polska Akademia Nauk. Muzeum i Instytut Zoologii ; Meeting of the European Ornithologists' Union (2 ; 1999 ; Gdańsk)

Publisher:

Muzeum i Instytut Zoologii PAN

Place of publishing:

Warszawa

Description:

Referat wygłoszony na Second Meeting of the European Ornithologists' Union ; Bibliogr. p. 120-121 ; P. [117]-121 : ill. ; 27 cm ; Abstract in Polish. Taxa in Latin

Abstract:

Many reedbed passerines forage outside their nesting territory. This peculiar behaviour could allow reproductive individuals to feed in areas where resources are plentiful and/or to nest in areas where predation risks are low. These hypotheses were investigated for the Moustached Warbler Acrocephalus melanopogon and the Reed Warbler A. scirpaceus in a 40-ha of reedbed in southern France. Vegetation structure, abundance of arthropod-prey, location of singing males, and bird local abundance were estimated along three transects 1-km long and 125-m distant parallel to the shore. Reed density increased from the lake inland, concurrently with a decrease in plant diversity. Food availability (sweep-netted arthropods weighted by their occurrence in species diet) varied positively with plant diversity and negatively with reed density. The dummy-nest experiment suggested a negative relationship between predation risks and reed density. While local abundance of each Acrocephalus species correlated spatially with food abundance, singing males were distributed evenly among the three transects. This suggests that predation risk associated with vegetation density has little influence on nest-site selection. The regular spacing of singing males further suggests that predation risk is primarily affected by nest density.

Relation:

Acta Ornithologica

Volume:

35

Issue:

1

Start page:

117

End page:

121

Format:

application/pdf

Resource Identifier:

oai:rcin.org.pl:45255

Source:

MiIZ PAN, call no. P.257, Vol. 35, No 1 ; MiIZ PAN, call no. P.4568, Vol. 35, No 1 ; click here to follow the link

Language:

eng ; pol

Rights:

Rights Reserved - Restricted Access

Terms of use:

Copyright-protected material. Access only on terminals at the Museum and Institute of Zoology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, may be used within the limits of statutory user freedoms.

Digitizing institution:

Museum and Institute of Zoology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Original in:

Library of the Museum and Institute of Zoology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Projects co-financed by:

Programme Innovative Economy, 2010-2014, Priority Axis 2. R&D infrastructure ; European Union. European Regional Development Fund

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