Object

Title: Depopulation as an opportunity, not a threat to cities and regions: a paradigm change

Creator:

Janicki, Wojciech

Date issued/created:

2017

Resource Type:

Article

Subtitle:

Europa XXI 32 (2017)

Publisher:

IGiPZ PAN

Place of publishing:

Warsaw

Description:

29 cm

Abstract:

The process of population decline in highly developed countries is commonly perceived as a problem, particularly in some regions of these countries. Population growth is likewise seen as a daunting challenge. This indirectly leads to the conceptually faulty conclusion that the one and only balanced and safe population size is the current one. In reality, negative population growth on both national and regional levels also has its advantages – which do not typically garner much interest or consideration, obscured by the unsubstantiated argument that depopulation is mostly damaging to the well-being of the nation. Regardless of the pros and cons of depopulation, the fact that the process is underway is undisputable. Depopulation is generally accompanied by accelerated rates of aging in a given population. Given the dearth of effective tools to reverse these trends, it is wiser to cease all attempts to reverse the irreversible and instead focus on preparing the organizational structures of states and regions for the economic and social ramifications of depopulation.

References:

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Relation:

Europa XXI

Volume:

32

Start page:

89

End page:

96

Format:

File size 2,7 MB ; application/pdf

Resource Identifier:

oai:rcin.org.pl:63689 ; 1429-7132 ; 10.7163/Eu21.2017.32.6

Source:

CBGiOŚ. IGiPZ PAN, call nos.: Cz.6406, Cz.6407 ; click here to follow the link

Language:

eng

Rights:

Creative Commons Attribution BY 3.0 PL license

Terms of use:

Copyright-protected material. [CC BY 3.0 PL] May be used within the scope specified in Creative Commons Attribution BY 3.0 PL license, full text available at: ; -

Digitizing institution:

Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Original in:

Central Library of Geography and Environmental Protection. Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization PAS

Projects co-financed by:

European Union. European Regional Development Fund ; Programme Innovative Economy, 2010-2014, Priority Axis 2. R&D infrastructure

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