Obiekt

Tytuł: The geography of Japanese direct investment in the U.S. automotive sector: A review of the state of knowledge and some ideas for future research

Twórca:

Reid, Neil

Data wydania/powstania:

2014

Typ zasobu:

Text

Inny tytuł:

Geographia Polonica Vol. 87 No. 3 (2014)

Wydawca:

IGiPZ PAN

Miejsce wydania:

Warszawa

Opis:

24 cm

Abstrakt:

Beginning in the mid-1980s Japanese manufacturing companies began to invest heavily in U.S. production capacity. This was partly a response to a weakening U.S. dollar and trade protectionist measures imposed by the U.S. government. Japanese investment in U.S. production capacity continues unabated today. As more and more Japanese manufacturers started manufacturing their products in the United States there was an interest among geographers to understand the spatial dynamics of this investment. Much of this investment was directed towards the automotive sector. Given the large amount of investment that flowed into the automotive sector the purpose of this is to summarize three decades of scholarly research on Japanese direct investment in this sector.

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Czasopismo/Seria/cykl:

Geographia Polonica

Tom:

87

Zeszyt:

3

Strona pocz.:

383

Strona końc.:

400

Szczegółowy typ zasobu:

Artykuł

Format:

Rozmiar pliku 2,3 MB ; application/pdf

Identyfikator zasobu:

0016-7282 ; 10.7163/GPol.2014.26 ; oai:rcin.org.pl:47370

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CBGiOS. IGiPZ PAN, sygn.: Cz.2085, Cz.2173, Cz.2406 ; kliknij tutaj, żeby przejść

Język:

eng

Prawa:

Licencja Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska

Zasady wykorzystania:

Zasób chroniony prawem autorskim. [CC BY 3.0 PL] Korzystanie dozwolone zgodnie z licencją Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska, której pełne postanowienia dostępne są pod adresem: ; -

Digitalizacja:

Instytut Geografii i Przestrzennego Zagospodarowania Polskiej Akademii Nauk

Lokalizacja oryginału:

Centralna Biblioteka Geografii i Ochrony Środowiska Instytutu Geografii i Przestrzennego Zagospodarowania PAN

Dofinansowane ze środków:

Unia Europejska. Europejski Fundusz Rozwoju Regionalnego ; Program Operacyjny Innowacyjna Gospodarka, lata 2010-2014, Priorytet 2. Infrastruktura strefy B + R

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